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Crazy

into_the_wild

Dreams are what you wake up from.

14 years of Livejournalling, and hopefully, more to come.


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Crazy
into_the_wild

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:: Double Entries for Today ::

In the journey of our lives there's always a guiding principle that dictates
our courses of action.
It is this principle that makes us do what we do, and
makes us intrisically uniquely ourselves.

How this principle is derived can be rather interesting.
For most, I presume it is an act of monkey-read/see/hears/feels-monkey-do.
Monkey reads a deeply moving book and gets enlightened.
Monkey sees an inspirational movie and his life goes tangential.
Monkey hears the wise words of the guru and takes up yoga.
Monkey feels the electromagnetic pulses and becomes psychic.
For me, it is like seeing the world in a binoculars and
removing it henceforth.
The world seems more three-dimensional, no?

Mrs Foster, my humanities form teacher used the word "Epiphany"
to describe the protagonist's feelings in James Joyce's 'Araby'.
It is a sudden realisation that triggers a life-changing chain-reaction.
Often induced by a crisis.

My crisis will then be while I was fourteen, involving my father's kidney failure,
and then my talk to Joanne.
My epiphany will then be the questioning of religion several years later.
and it is best epitomised by Mr Campbell.

To quote Joseph Campbell:
"A wonderful example is a story I was told about a Buddhist monk whom a friend was following.
Now in Tibet, people go to a slaughter-house, buy a lamb that is about to be killed,
then give the lamb its freedom, and that is a pious act.
Accordingly, this monk, who had a cluster of beautiful girls around him, was going to perform a pious act
by freeing five hundred fish.

And so, with his constellation of beauties, he went from one bait shop to another trying to buy
five hundred minnows.
But bait was in short supply, and the shopkeepers said they were not going to sell him minnows
for liberation.
Finally , however, he found a shop that would, and he and his entourage, carrying buckets of fish,
went down to the shore, where they had a ceremony of blessing the fish that were about to be given their freedom.
They they dumped one bucket after another into the ocean.
Well, pelicans flocked from every point of the compass, and the
little monk ran back and forth, waving his robe,
trying to chase the pelicans away.

Now, what is good for pelicans is bad for fish, and
this monk has taken sides.
He was not in the middle place.
This is to me a very important story.
Every now and then, I wake up laughing at that monk and his
banquet for the pelicans.

That is why the story of the lion lying down with the lamb is so silly.
Read concretely, you realise that when the lion is eating the lamb,
he is lying down with it.
That's how it was meant to be, and "shanti, shanti, shanti";
nothing is happening.
That is the perspective of the sublime,
which annihilates ego consciousness and its relationship.
Without changing the world, there is escape from sorrow just by
shifting the
experience.

Life will always be sorrowful.

We can't change it, but we can
change our attitude toward it. "

......

Now, recall the man throwing the starfish back into the ocean?







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life will always be sorrowful? you are taking only a human perspective, i take it. i totally disagree with that, i'm afraid. only humans talk (whine) about life. other living things go on, rain or shine, with it all. life, that is. funny, huh.

joseph campbell... interesting

that's joseph campbell's take.
but i subscribe to that. life being sorrowful doesn't equate to being sorrowful; there's a difference yeah?

*ponders*

nod

that's the buddhist's take on life. in zen/taoism, life is sweet.

there's this zen painting of three disciples of the tao, buddhism, and zen drinking tea from the same teapot (metaphor for life). i'm sure you can guess their respective facial expressions.

speaking of, go to the Jandela (2nd floor) of the Esplanade if you and your friend have the time. look for this painting called superstring.

be well

i like the story of the man throwing starfishes back into the ocean. i've thrown way too many starfishes back into the ocean. am still throwing.

well for the monk to buy the minnows, he had actually created a market for the purchase of minnows, and hence more minnows will be caught to supply this demand. so is that more freedom for the minnows ?

is there really a centre path all the time ? serendipity is also when we still take sides and know that it is all part of life and live it fully. rather than to look at all of it mournfully, and agonise over it ? the universe will find its own balance somewhere somehow. our part is to live it considerately...

cest la vie !

another 20 man points.
damn it...
which book did u get this one from?
my collection of campbell's work is
photocopied class notes back from UWA years.

what does those "man points" do?

Do people use them to redeem something?

interesting metaphor. i likes.

err. no, when someone hit 50/100 i stop talking
to them with my head voice and use my normal voice. and when someone hit above 100, I'll use my tummy voice (diaprhargm or however u spell it)

and also i'll prolly expect people with high man points to buy me coffee, and pay for dinner.he he he he... nah.. basically it's something funny started by ikepod and alffy long time ago.

Life will always be sorrowful... AND joyful.
;P

Buddha is not a pessimist, he is merely stating the obvious. He could have delivered sermons about happiness all the time but do doctors open clinics to treat the happy and healthy??

He who recognise that life is suffering and who seek the right way (middle way) out is blessed. For he will have the wisdom for himself and for others when suffering in its myriad forms eventually and inevitably comes...

i think it's beautiful...

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